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National President Acts

Mrs. Benson, the National League President sent the following letter to all U.S. Senators on October 27, 1971 concerning the Congressional moves to cut U.S. contributions to the U.N. in retaliation for U.-N. expulsion of the Republic of China:

Dear Senator:

The League of Women Voters urges you to vote against any moves to reduce the U.S. financial contributions to the United Nations as retaliation for the General Assembly vote to seat the People's Republic of China and expel the Republic of China,

Such a move would signal adoption of a tit-for-tat attitude towards foreign policy and would only exacerbate tensions which have been generated by our present economic and trade positions. If there is one thing we do not need at the present time, it's a hot-headed response to developments on the international scene.

As Senator Mansfield implied when he stated the "we can't pick up our marbles and go home," the United States has a mature and stabilizing role to play on the world scene. A Senate temper tantrum triggered by the U.N. expulsion of the Taiwan government would seriously damage our credibility and good faith.

The League is in full agreement with the letter sent to U.N. Ambassador Bush by Senator Mathias and 31 other Senators which stated that "it seems to us inappropriate for such pressure to be linked with American participation in an organization which offers so much potential for building the generation of peace which the President and all Americans yearn for."

In our judgment a cutback in U.S. support of the world body would be a gross misreading of the desires and aspirations of the people of this country. The Lodge Commission last fall found a strong commitment in all parts of the country to U.S. efforts to strengthen the United Nations. Continued U.S. financial support was never more needed than at this crucial moment of time. . We consider it essential that lenders of both political parties work to increase rather than decrease the importance of the United Nations in future U.S. foreign policies and practices.

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