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From the President (Diane Hastert)
Units
Program Planning
Board Bulletin
Observers for City & State Agencies
Action Alley
Nominations Please!
Voters Service Reports (Gretel McLane)
Get Ready for the Legislature
Campaign Financing Consensus Results
Transportation
Catalyst
League Pulse
Painter's Panaceas
International Relations and Trade (Mildred Sikkema)
United States thru Soviet Eyes... (Barbara Wiebenga)
Roster

United States thru Soviet Eyes...

Russians find everything in U.S. packaged. by Boris Streinikov & Vasily Peskov (both men are correspondents, one for Pravda, the other for Komsomolskaya Pravda).

Everything in America is packaged-- everything is packaged, tagged, stacked on labeled shelves, and has a standard shape and its own place on the counter.. This applies not only to goods but to the whole way of life—tags, names, figures of speech: the White House, the Pentagon, Wall Street. They use images for policy: hawks and doves, New Deal, New Frontier, Great Society. Workers are "blue-collar", "white-collar", "gray-collar". Scientists are "eggheads" and the military are "brass". Marines are "leathernecks" and Mexican farm laborers are "wetbacks" because they swim the Rio Grande by night to get jobs in Texas. "They are mercilessly exploited."

Each state has a nickname: Garden State, Potato State, Silver State, Pine State, and the Land of Enchantment. Don't look for state capitals among the big cities. The capital of New Youk State is not huge New York City but little Albany. In Illinois it is not Chicago, but Springfield.

They say that if advertising stopped for one day, Americans would be at a loss to know what to do. Advertising occupies ninth place among major industries. $20,000,000 a year is spent on ads—almost the cost to put men on the moon America advertizes everything—toothpaste, shoelaces, jetliners and people seeking elective office. "A man is offered in life's marketplace like any other goods."

Barbara Wiebenga
Chairman IR&T

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