August-September, 1980 Home   Newsletters

October, 1980

November, 1980

Juveniles and the Justice System
President's Message (Barbara Farwell)
Toot Your Horn
October Units
City Prosecutor Forum (Barbara Farwell)
Presidential Elections Forum (Pat Shutt)
Learn to Lobby Workshop
Happenings at Honolulu Hale
League Office in an Election Year (Carol Whitesell)
Election Day Anecdotes...
Big Winner!
Thoughts on TheBUS (Ghost Rider)
Calendar
Membership
Year of the Coast
Aloha Tower Festival

Aloha Tower Festival

DATE: October 19, 1980 (Sunday)

PLACE: Piers 9 and 10, Honolulu Harbor

TIME: 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

ADMISSION FREE

Exhibits, Music, Picnic on the Pier.

Tours of the ships. Harbor tours.

See the Ships!

Mini -OTEC The world's first at-sea, closed cycle plant to generate electrical energy using the principle of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC).

Townsend Cromwell A 163 ft. long National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research ship designed and outfitted to perform all types of oceanographic or fisheries work in any weather or climatic conditions. Three laboratorie for biological, chemical and hydro-graphic work and sic winches for jobs ranging from water chemistry profiles to stern trawl fishing.

Falls of Clyde Built in 1878 in Scotland. Claimed to be the only remaining four-masted full-rigged ship in the world. In 1973, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Destiny Built in 1934 by William Randolph Hearst, the 81ft long twin-masted, wooden-hulled staysail schooner is now chartered by the University of Hawaii's Blue Water Marine Lab to run educational marine cruises.

Easy Rider and Easy Rider Too The first U.S. Fishing Vessel which can process fish at sea, and can serve as a mother ship to other fishing vessels.

Kana Keoki A University of Hawaii, 156-ft. long research vessel outfitted to do marine geological, geophysical, and physical oceanography research.

LET'S MEET THE COASTAL CHALLENGE AND PREVENT THE TIME WHEN

-No trespassing signs block the entrance to your favorite beach;

-The fish you catch are inedible due to contamination;

-The roadside panorama of the ocean becomes a peephole between highrises;

-Significant historical sites such as heiaus are no more;

-Water is not only harmful to fish and birds, but affects the health of residents also;

-And finally, tourists decide that the worn-out beaches of Hawaii are not worth the trip.

1980 has been designated the Year of the Coast--- a year to evaluate and, hopefully, balance the conflicting demands placed on Hawaii's 750 miles of coastline.

HAWAII'S COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
IMPLEMENTED IN 1978, HELPS MEET THE COASTAL CHALLENGE BY:

*Evaluating developments along the shore, both residential and industrial.

*Balancing conflicting demands for recreational purposes._

*Protecting historic and scenic areas.

*Protecting and managing important coastal ecosystems.

*Increasing beach access for all citizens.

*Protecting our life from coastal hazards.

*Managing the ocean resources.

WHO'S IN CHARGE?

The Department of Planning and Economic Development is the state lead agency. Several state agencies besides the counties are involved in managing Hawaii's coastal zone. (=all land except forest reserve and federally owned lands as well as three miles state's territorial water.

SPECIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS(SMAs) is determined by each county. A SMA use permit is necessary for a development within the SMA.

A PUBLIC HEARING must be held before a county can act upon a SMA use application, in case of a development with potentially significant environmental effects, or when a request is made by any person or agency.

COME AND FIND OUT MORE ABOUT ABOUT HAWAII'S LAND AND WATER MANAGEMENT.

ROAM AROUND THE DISPLAYS AND EXHIBITS. VISIT THE FACTORY SHIP, MINI -OTEC AND RESEARCH VESSELS, AND LEARN ABOUT THE OCEAN RESOURCES.

JOIN THE FREE HARBO TOURS!


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