January 1987 Home   Newsletters

February 1987

March 1987

Aloha, Members, New Members and Prospective Members:
League Interviews Council - Arnold Morgado (Arlene Ellis & Astrid Monson)
League Interviews Council - John DeSoto (Dee Lum & Mary Francis Sutphen)
League Interviews Council - Randall Iwase (Jean Aoki & Dorothy Murdock)
League Interviews Council - Dennis O'Connor (Rhoda Miller & Opal Sloane)
President's Message (Arlene Ellis)
Birthday Bash
USCINPAC Tour
Community Benefit Assessments
Development Agreements
Convention Center
Bills on Campaign Ethics
State Convention
YWCA News
League Education Study
MBHN Study
Vote Count Schedule
Neighborhood Boards
Annual Meeting
Calendar of Events

League Education Study

A year ago the League of Women Voters of Hawaii took on a study of public education, specifically how alternative choices could upgrade and reform education for Hawaii's youth.

Committees of the League have been gathering ex-citing resource materials from around the country on alternatives that are working, are proposed, or are not working. There is a real flourishing of status quo of choices in education as educators and the public recognize that the status quo of education is critically deficient in preparing students for the post-industrial information society.

Hawaii has "islands" of excellence in its educational system -- but the general educational standard is too low, and many students are riot being served by a single, limited pattern of teaching and learning.

We are involving teachers, students, parents and the community in our effort to build collaborative action. We are working with the PTSA of Hawaii, the Chamber of Commerce Education Committee, AAUW, the DOE and University of Hawaii, especially Community Colleges. We recognize the central role of teachers in any action for educational improvement.

In November 1986 we held a Conference on ACTION FOR EDUCATION: A NEW ERA IN HAWAII, and brought Dr. Mary Anne Raywid of Hofstra University in New York as resource to the Conference. Dr. Raywid's message on SCHOOLS OF CHOICE was eagerly received by Conference participants and is central to our continuing study. We find SCHOOLS OF CHOICE to be a flexible, practical and already successfully implemented process in many states -- that would go far to meet the critical needs of Hawaii's public schools.

SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS OF CHOICE have two basic principles: 1) CHOICE programs must be founded on choice for students, teachers, staff and parents. In short, all these must choose to be in the special program. They must NOT be assigned by the system. In fact, the initiative for a special program most often comes from the school itself -- not from top planners. CHOICE programs can be a program-within-a-school where a special interest/focus is integrated with basic skills, and a high interest curriculum.

2) CHOICE programs must have AUTONOMY to carry out their innovative plans in all respects: financial, personnel, program, etc. It is obvious that if a new program is to succeed it will need to depart from "old" ways of planning and behaving.

The result of these two principles is a deep commitment to the CHOICE program by all involved in it, and a resultant dramatic rise in performance of teachers and students.

"LISTENING TO TEACHERS"

All meetings will be held at AAUW Residence, 1802 Keeaumoku St. (next to the Presbyterian Church) at 4:00 P.M. on Wednesdays.

Feb. 18 - LISTENING TO TEACHERS OF SCIENCE & MATH

Mar. 04 - LISTENING TO TEACHERS OF ENGLISH

Mar. 18 - LISTENING TO TEACHERS OF HUMANITIES & SOCIAL STUDIES

Apr. 01 - LISTENING TO TEACHERS OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

January 1987 Home   Newsletters March 1987